Cady Clay Works

Pots of Quality - Since 1987
 

EVENTS


2019 STORE HOURS
1/1/19 to 4/28/19

 10am – 4pm

 March - 8 & 9    22 & 23

 April - 5 & 6    19 & 20   SAPA Spring Celebration - 27,28,29                     

Or any time by appointment:  910-464-5661

                         cadyclayworks@yahoo.com



STORE-WIDE SALE
2/7/19 to 4/28/19

Most items in our store are now between 10% and 40% off the original price.  Stop in to see the changing selection!  Please note that we now offer a larger discount for cash or check purchases. 

Here's the key to the color dots that can be seen in the Gallery photos:

Cash or Check    Charge

     - 10%            no discount

     - 15%               - 10%

     - 25%               - 15%

     - 30%               - 20%

     - 40%               - 30%                                               



THE CHICKEN ARCHIVES
2/8/19 to 4/28/19

     In conjunction with the Busbee Road Valentine Celebration, we will feature our latest "Archive" sale, "THE CHICKEN ARCHIVES" - our collection of pottery chickens made in NC during the past 32 years.  We are saying good-by to our customers this year, and passing along some of the hundreds of pieces of clay art we have collected since we opened Cady Clay Works in 1987.  We have chickens by potters such as Charles Moore, Larry Moore, Crystal King, Anna King, Craig Kovak and others.  Stop in for a piece of NC pottery history!  View the collection on our website Gallery pages.

          "Hand-sculpted pottery chickens have been made in rural southern pottery communities for centuries.  They were often made by the wives and children of potter/farmers and tucked into the kiln alongside the larger, utilitarian pottery pieces.  Sold to tourists locally, or at shops in the mountains, they provided extra income for the pottery families."



SALT GLAZE ARCHIVES
2/9/19 to 4/28/19

 Give a gift of American pottery history with a selection from the sale of our 40-year collection of salt-glazed ware.  Discover the story behind each unique piece.  Works for sale include antique Southern and Midwestern pottery, vintage Cady Clay Works salt-glazed ware by John Mellage, vintage Seagrove area pottery, and one-of-a-kind pieces from Rowe Pottery Works, Rockdale Union Stoneware and Wisconsin Pottery.  We have clayworks from first firings, kiln accidents, prototypes, commemorative pieces, special decorations, collaborative pieces, and other rare items.



HISTORY OF SALT-GLAZED POTTERY
2/9/19 to 4/28/19

 SALT-GLAZE POTTERY…

    … was discovered in 13th century Germany,  probably by accident when salt-soaked driftwood or barrel staves were used for fuel in a kiln.  The unglazed, functional ware (crocks, jugs, etc) came out of the kiln with a shiny glass coating that was a result of the sodium in the salt bonding with the silica in the stoneware clay.  It became a very economical way to glaze pottery, as the ware could be stacked in the kiln, touching, and the glaze process took place during the firing, not by hand one piece at a time.

     We met in 1985 while working at Rowe Pottery Works in Cambridge, WI.  Jim Rowe had been a studio potter using a salt-glaze kiln when the “country” decorating look sparked a new interest in antique pots.  He figured out how to make early-American reproduction ware and at one time had 100 employees, including 12 full-time potters.

     Our first kiln in Seagrove was a gas-fired salt kiln.  We made historically-inspired items from stoneware clay decorated with cobalt-blue designs,  as well as more contemporary ware made from white porcelain clay. 



ARCHIVES - THE SALT GLAZE COLLECTION - CROCKS
2/9/19 to 4/28/19

(Photos of these pieces are on our Gallery Page)
RPW 1 PINT CROCK w/COW DECORATION  1983  by KEN NEKOLA Ken was the first potter hired by Jim Rowe. The production potters, who were paid by the piece, loved these small crocks as they were fast to throw and had no fussy embellishments.  ROWE POTTERY WORKS, CAMBRIDGE, WI

SF  SMALL MIXING BOWL W/COW    1993  This bowl, decorated with a happy cow, was purchased on a fall visit to New England.  Potters tend to visit other potters when on vacation – it’s an occupational hazard!  SALMON FALLS STONEWARE,  DOVER, NH

RPW  1 GALLON CROCK w/FLORAL    1983  by JOEL HUNTLEY The first firing of the new, gas-fired salt kiln in 1983 did not turn out at all.  Jim Rowe was so disgusted that he didn’t unload a thing, just re-bricked the kiln door and fired the entire load again the next day.  After the second firing, the liner glaze came out a beautiful brick red but not the desired brown, and  the clay color was more beige than gray.  It was July, so we called these the “red, white and blue pots”.  Joel Huntley went on to found Wisconsin Pottery.  ROWE POTTERY WORKS, CAMBRIDGE, WI

RUS 1 GALLON CROCK w/FLORAL   1993  by RIC LAMORE  This crock was made for us by our friends at ROCKDALE UNION STONEWARE, CAMBRIDGE, WI, which was founded by disgruntled RPW workers. It has a personalized floral design on front in the manner of old advertising crocks, and a simple floral design on the back.

RPW 1 GALLON OVOID CROCK w/LUGS  1982  (PROTOTYPE) by JIM ROWE  This is a prototype thrown by Jim Rowe, with floral decoration by Ed Klein. Only a handful were made as it never went into production.  Jim was rarely free to throw pots himself because of the company’s rapid growth in the 1980s. ROWE POTTERY WORKS, CAMBRIDGE, WI

RPW 2 GALLON OVOID CROCK w/ LUGS  1983(PROTOTYPE) by JIM ROWE  This is a prototype thrown by Jim Rowe. Only a handful were made as it never went into production.  Jim was rarely free to throw pots himself because of the company’s rapid growthin the 1980s.   This crock features the “Norton Bird” design, afteran iconic decoration of the Norton Pottery, Bennington, VT, in the 1800s.  ROWE POTTERY WORKS, CAMBRIDGE, WI

RPW  2 GALLON CROCK w/LUGS   1986  by GLENN CUTCHER  This crock features the “Norton Deer” design, after an iconic decoration of the Norton Pottery, Bennington, VT, in the 1800s.  ROWE POTTERY WORKS, CAMBRIDGE, WI

RPW  BAKING DISH    1982  (PROTOTYPE) by JIM ROWE  This is a prototype thrown and decorated by Jim Rowe, who was rarely free to throw pots himself because of the company’s rapid growth in the 1980s.  When this came out of the kiln, he handed it to Beth Gore and asked her to take it home and bake in it to “product test” the new shape.  ROWE POTTERY WORKS, CAMBRIDGE, WI

RPW  BEAN POT w/PIG     1987  by JOHN MELLAGE  John had to use up his “personal pot” allowance on this piece one month because he forgot to stamp it with his personal potter’s mark so it could not be sold!  Historically, the wide handle on this design enabled housewives to pull a bean pot out of the back of the stove or fireplace, where it had been cooking for many hours, with a long metal rod. MADE AT ROWE POTTERY WORKS, WI

CCW  PORCELAIN TUREEN/PUNCH BOWL  by JOHN MELLAGE  This piece was fired in the first kiln John built for Cady Clay Works, at our rented shop on Hwy 705. The fine particle size of porcelain clay makes it more difficult to throw than stoneware, and results in a more subtle salt-glaze texture.  This was embellished with “Pearl” and “Pearly Blue” slips.  CADY CLAY WORKS,  SEAGROVE, NC

CCW  LIDDED CROCK W/FLORAL DESIGN  by JOHN MELLAGE,  decorated by BETH GORE  The first kiln John built when we opened Cady Clay Works was a gas-fired salt-glaze kiln.   Historically, large lidded crocks like this were used to store and preserve various foodstuffs (sauerkraut, salt-preserved meat, etc.) before the Industrial Revolution. CADY CLAY WORKS,  SEAGROVE, NC

CCW  7 GALLON CROCK W/FLORAL DESIGN  by JOHN MELLAGE,  decorated by BETH GORE  The first kiln John built when we opened Cady Clay Works was a gas-fired salt-glaze kiln.   Historically, large crocks like this were used to store and preserve various foodstuffs (sauerkraut, salt-preserved meat, etc.) before the Industrial Revolution.  CADY CLAY WORKS,  SEAGROVE, NC